Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?

By Penny M. Miller | Go to book overview

TABLES, MAPS, AND FIGURES
TABLES
1 History of Federal Aid to Kentucky, 1890-1990 , 39
2 Most Important Problem Facing Kentucky , 69
3 Occupations of Kentucky Legislators, as Percentage Distribution , 104
4 Demographic Characteristics of Kentucky Legislators, as Percentage Distribution, 105
5 Number of Two-Year Legislative Sessions Served , 108
6 Outcome of Bills in Kentucky General Assembly, 1986-92 , 122
7 Partisan Percentages and Votes Cast in Statewide Elections, 1966-92 , 181
8 Interest Group Involvement in 1974 and 1990 Kentucky Legislature , 190
9 Spending by Lobbyists in 1986 and 1990 Sessions of the General Assembly, 193
10 Voting Turnout in Kentucky General Elections, 1978-92 , 203
11 Voting Turnout in Kentucky Primary Elections, 1978-92 , 204
12 Spending by Candidates for Three Statewide Offices in Democratic Primaries, 1975-91, 220
13 Spending by Candidates in Legislative Races, 1975-90 , 221
14 State General Expenditures, as Percentage Distribution, 1990 , 228
15 State Government Tax Revenue, as Percentage Distribution, 1990 , 231
16 Distribution of Executive and Legislative Municipal Powers in Kentucky, 272
17 Kentucky Cities: Percentage Distribution of General Expenditures, Fiscal Year 1990, 282
18 Kentucky Cities: Percentage Distribution of General Revenue, Fiscal Year 1990, 283
19 Average Revenues from Local, State, and Federal Sources for County Governments in Kentucky, Fiscal Year 1987, 296
20 Kentucky Small Cities Community Development Block Grant Program, 299

-ix-

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