Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?

By Penny M. Miller | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Kentucky in the Federal System: Dependence and Resistance

Kentucky has long maintained an ambivalent relationship with the federal government, both depending on the national government and resisting its influence. This dependence-resistance is one form of the divisiveness that has characterized Kentucky's political past. Kentuckians also have defined themselves as a part of the region of which Kentucky is the northern boundary, often as an especially needy neighbor among the southern states. As noted in chapter 2, Kentucky's southern connection has divided it since statehood. These two themes--dependence-resistance and peripheral southernness--pervade much of the state's past and present relations with other governments. At the same time, the form that these themes have taken has changed (as have all aspects of life in Kentucky) with the state's changing economic, cultural, and political development.

Kentucky has repeatedly sought rescue by the federal government. Throughout the generations, the state has often relied on its national political influence, based on the seniority and eloquence of its congressional delegation. At other times--and even at the same time--Kentucky has viewed the federal government as her people's principal enemy, the political leadership's whipping boy, scapegoat, and excuse.

Intergovernmental outcomes do not always evidence those two extremes. Variously labeled "models" of federalism (more than 326 classifications) have been offered by scholars.1 These divergent models include the dominant "dual federalism" model of the period from the signing of the U.S. Constitution until the New Deal, a pattern suggesting equality between the national and state governments; the alternative model of "cooperative federalism," continuing from President Franklin D. Roosevelt until the mid-1960s (sometimes called "marble cake federalism"2), denoting the intertwined

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 474

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.