Marriage Analysis: Foundations for Successful Family Life

By Harold T. Christensen | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION AND ORIENTATION

It was the wise man, Solomon, who said: "There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not: The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon a rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid."1

Since Solomon's day, man has learned much concerning these problems, and others. Yet, there is much that remains to be learned. Human behavior, especially, is complex; and, although man has never ceased extending the boundaries of knowledge concerning himself, there has always remained a residue not completely understood--problems to be solved, challenges in man's continuous quest.

Our concern throughout this writing will be with but one thing, "the way of a man with a maid." We move forward in humility and in confidence; humility in the realization that we do not have all of the answers but confidence in the knowledge that we are on the way, and that out of serious study can come both better understanding and richer living.


THE MEANING OF MARRIAGE

There is general agreement among students of society that the family is the most central and basic of all human groupings. The family is the child's first contact with the outside world; it receives him when he is more impressionable, interacts with him in a more intimate manner, and often holds him longer than any other group. It is there that attitudes and habits are first formed, that personality takes shape. The family is the seedbed of character and the workshop of social progress.

____________________
1
Proverbs 30:18-19. Italics not in the original.

-3-

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