The Fertility of American Women

By Wilson H. Grabill; Clyde V. Kiser et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3 THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

A. Birth statistics

Although this monograph is intended to be mainly an analysis of census data on fertility, it would be incomplete without some use of the extensive and valuable birth registration data collected by the States and compiled on a national basis by the National Office of Vital Statistics. Most of the measures of fertility which have been developed thus far, including the relatively new field of cohort fertility, are derived from birth registration data.

A series of national estimates of annual births for the period from 1909 to 1934, prepared by P. K. Whelpton and published by the National Office of Vital Statistics, is used in some of the tables below. The series incorporates carefully prepared estimates for States not in the Birth Registration Area and also incorporates adjustments for underregistration. The Birth Registration Area was established in 1915, with ten States and the District of Columbia. Other States were admitted to the Area when their registration systems attained a required degree of reliability.1 It attained nationwide coverage in 1933 with the admission of Texas. The tables make use of the National Office of Vital Statistics underregistration- corrected data for years from 1935. Attention is also called to the existence of other estimates of births and birth rates which various writers have prepared and published since at least 1806.2 Thus, at least a rough idea can be obtained of the magnitude and trends of births and birth rates in the United States for many years before the completion of the Birth Registration Area.

Crude birth rates. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the United States had an estimated annual birth rate of 32 births per 1,000 inhabitants. The birth rate declined in irregular fashion, from about 30.0 in 1.909 to 18.4 in 1933 (table 11). It dipped during World War I, recovered to a postwar high in 1921, and then declined fairly steadily. Monthly data indicate that the birth rate reached its lowest level in September 1933, about ten months after the presidential election in November 1932, which

____________________
1
At least 90 percent of the births were supposed to be registered, although this condition was not always met. Only two States had less than 90 percent coverage in 1950 and both were close to that level. Nationally, 97.9 percent of births were registered in 1950, as compared with 92.5 percent in 1940.
2
An example, Blodget's data, was given in Chapter 2, table 1.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fertility of American Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.