A History of Canada: - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
THE FIRST ATTEMPT AT COLONIZATION UNDER ROBERVAL

Cartier's colonial programme. His appointment as Captain-General of the expedition. The King of Spain's opposition to the project. Roberval's commission. Power to recruit prisoners as colonists. The settlement of Cartier at Charlesbourg-Royal. Visit to Hochelaga. Discovery of gold and diamonds. Departure for France. Roberval en route with soldiers and prisoners. Meeting with Cartier at Newfoundland. Roberval settles at Charlesbourg. Attempts to reach the Saguenay. Cartier's minerals worthless. Roberval's recall to France.

Despite the excellent news Cartier brought with him on his return, it seems scarcely to have awakened any immediate reaction. Since the Royal Council insisted upon keeping his discovery of gold a guarded secret, it appeared to most that he had brought back much less than he had promised. Cartier let no word of his findings slip into his report, and indeed it was Francis I who divulged the matter in January 1540. But over and above all other considerations, Cartier could not have come back to France at a more unfortunate time: France had gone to war against Spain just two weeks before he docked. However, neither Cartier nor Canada slipped the King's memory. As soon as royal engagements permitted, he received the Breton navigator and Donnacona. The latter told over and over with all the assurance of the born liar that the Saguenay contained "numerous mines of gold and silver," and added for good measure that "abundance of cloves, nutmeg and pepper" were harvested there. Asiatic spices and American gold! The King was so delighted by this news that in May 1537 he made Cartier the magnificent gift of the Grande Hermine, complete with all rigging and gear. Finally, in September 1538, his financial burdens having been lightened by the truce of Nice,

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Canada: - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 402

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.