A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
RESTITUTION OF CANADA TO FRANCE AND COLONIZATION

England makes restitution of the colony. The Jesuits are chosen to carry the gospel to the Indians. The Récollets are continuously excluded. Champlain's return. The first settlers set foot in the country. The fur trade and alliances with the Indians. The first Iroquois offensive. Three Rivers is founded. Giffard and Norman and Percheron settlements. The death of Champlain. His policy and achievements.

Once the ink had dried on the Treaty of St. Germain-en-Laye, Richelieu issued orders to reoccupy Quebec. This responsibility fell to the Company of New France, lords of the country, and the mission upon Champlain, since the company had appointed him commander of Quebec on March 21, 1629. French rule could not be re-established unless an expedition was sent out from France to take possession, and since the company's fleets had all been lost and the associates felt unequal to equipping a new fleet, Cardinal Richelieu put the task into the hands of Guillaume de Caën, in exchange for all furs traded that year. On January 20, 1632, the contract was signed with the Huguenot shipowner, who was obliged, for his part, to take three Capuchin monks and forty men out to the settlement.1

The appointment of the Capuchins amazed the Récollets, who, having been the first missionaries at Quebec, were preparing to return to their chapel and monastery there. They had secured royal assent to their projects but ran into opposition from the Cardinal's adviser, the Capuchin Father Joseph, administratorin-chief of foreign missions. He disliked the Récollets and so offered the mission to his own order. The Jesuits also campaigned to bring this apostolic field within their jurisdiction. They exercised their powers of persuasion over their friends

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