A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
RESUMPTION OF THE IROQUOIS WAR AND DISASTER AT THREE RIVERS

Quebec solicits an alliance with the English colonies against the Iroquois. Supervision over certain affairs given to Father Lalemant. A new proposal for a bishopric. The Indian warfare is resumed anew. Jeanne Mance and Maisonneuve plan recruiting. Lauzon appointed Governor. Court of justice. Disaster at Three Rivers. Reinforcements. Partial peace with the Iroquois. The Montreal recruits. Fur-trade post set up at Tadoussac. Peace becomes general. French establishment among the Onondagas. The colony makes slight progress. The Lauzon clique interferes. Royal decree of 1656. Departure of Lauzon.

As the Huron nation scattered to the four winds, the Iroquois made their presence felt within the colony. Their traces were picked up, a quite unusual occurrence, in the vicinity of Quebec, where they struck down three men. Early in August, thirty braves attacked about sixty Frenchmen at Three Rivers; the Frenchmen drove off the attack but they lost nine men, killed and wounded. D'Ailleboust kept his mobile unit of men constantly on the move, shifting from Quebec to Montreal and back again, infuriated by his own inability to suppress the Iroquois warfare upon the settlements. Since France sent no aid, he resolved to ask the English colonies to enter into an alliance with the French settlements against the Five Nations; the English colonies bordered on Five- Nation territory and this policy meant a mere renewal of previous relations.1

At that time the colonies of New England ( Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven), which ran from the Kennebec to the Hudson, held some forty thousand souls within their frontiers. Each of these several settlements enjoyed the fullest

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