A History of Canada: Volume One: From its Origins to the Royal Regime, 1663 - Vol. 1

By Gustave Lanctot; Josephine Hambleton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
THE SETTLERS ON THE COUNCIL OF QUEBEC AND THE RETURN OF THE FRENCH FROM ONONDAGA COUNTRY

The great decree of 1657. The people elect representatives to serve on the Council of Quebec. Extent of the councillors' powers. Third proposal to found a bishopric. The appointment of Abbé de Laval de Montigny. The Iroquois incorporate the Hurons into their tribes by force. The provisional governors: Lauzon- Charny and d'Ailleboust. The arrival of the Abbé de Queylus and of the Sulpicians. Claims of the Archbishop of Rouen. The Queylus-Jesuit quarrel. Iroquois intrigues. The French among the Onondagas and their escape.

Canadian interests were now most ably represented in Paris, since both Maisonneuve and d'Ailleboust were in France. The One Hundred Associates were extremely vexed at the way in which the Lauzon family had helped themselves to the furs, and now d'Ailleboust explained that the habitants, for whom he spoke, could not possibly "meet their debts nor even the public expenses in view of the state to which the fur trade was now reduced." The settlers even offered to return the trade to the Company of One Hundred Associates. The latter, however, did not care to repeat its experience in handling this traffic, and preferred to lay the matter before the King. Then, having agreement with d'Ailleboust and the creditors' spokesman, the company drafted a plan to reorganize the Council of Quebec. Its new intendant, M. de Lamoignon, submitted the draft to the Royal Council. Despite a campaign launched by Lauzon, who was anxious to delay the adoption of this decree until the ships had departed for Quebec so that his friends there could continue defrauding the Public Treasury for at least a year, the Royal Council adopted

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