The Continuity of Poetic Language: Studies in English Poetry from the 1540's to the 1940's

By Josephine Miles | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(Works named below have been selected on the basis of direct use in this study. Poetry used is listed in table 1, p. 389. Many other works on poetry and language have had a general bearing; a good many of these are listed in earlier bibliographies. At no time has a single poet's. work, or the work on him, been presented as a whole.)


PROSE

Agar Herbert. A Time for Greatness ( Boston, Little, Brown, 1942).

Bellow Saul. The Victim ( New York, Vanguard, 1947).

Foley Martha, ed. The Best American Short Stories, 1947 (and The Best [American] Short Stories of 1941, ed. Edward J. O'Brien), ( Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1947 and 1940).

Gordon Caroline. The Women on the Porch ( New York, Scribner's, 1944)

Gunther John. Inside U. S. A. ( New York, Harper, 1947).

Heiser Victor. An American Doctor's Odyssey ( New York, Norton, 1936).

Hemingway Ernest. For Whom the, Bell Tolls ( New York, Scribner's, 1940).

Hersey John. A Bell for Adano ( New York, Knopf, 1944).

----- Hiroshima ( New York, Knopf, 1946).

Herskovits Melville J. Man and His Works: The Science of Cultural Anthropology ( New York, Knopf, 1948).

Lerner Max. Ideas Are Weapons ( New York, Viking, 1939).

Liebman Joshua Loth. Peace of Mind ( New York, Simon and Schuster, 1946).

Lewis C. S. Out of the Silent Planet ( New York, Macmillan, 1943).

Lewis Sinclair. Kingsblood Royal ( New York, Random House, 1947).

Meyer Cord, Jr. Peace or Anarchy ( Boston, Little, Brown, 1947).

Northrop F. S. C. The Meeting of East and West ( New York, Macmillan, 1946).

Porter Katherine Anne. The Leaning Tower, and Other Stories ( New York, Harcourt, Brace, 1944).

Pyle Ernie. Here Is Your War ( New York, Holt, 1943).

Santayana George. Persons and Places, Vol. II: The Middle Span ( New York, Scribner's, 1945).

Sitwell Sacheverell. The Hunters and the Hunted ( London, Macmillan, 1947).

Steinbeck John. Cannery Row ( New York, Viking, 1945).

Toynbee Arnold. A Study of History (abridged ed.; Oxford Univ. Press, 1947).

Warren Robert Penn. All the King's Men ( New York, Harcourt, Brace, 1946).

-537-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Continuity of Poetic Language: Studies in English Poetry from the 1540's to the 1940's
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • THE PRIMARY LANGUAGE OF POETRY IN THE 1640''s *
  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • I. the Poetry of the 1540''s and the 1640''s 1
  • II- Twenty Poets of the 1640''s 46
  • Iii. Materials and Attitudes in Prose 103
  • Iv. Critical Attitudes and Descriptive Conclusions 125
  • Bibliography 155
  • THE PRIMARY LANGUAGE OF POETRY IN THE 1740''s AND 1840''s *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT *
  • I. Poetry of the 1740''s 161
  • Ii. Grounds of Prose in the 1740''s 223
  • Iii. Poetry of the 1840''s 258
  • Iv. Grounds of Prose in the 1840''s 322
  • V. Classic and Romantic 348
  • Bibliography 373
  • THE PRIMARY LANGUAGE OF POETRY IN THE 1940''s *
  • Title Page *
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT *
  • Contents *
  • I. Poetry of the 1940''s 383
  • Ii. Backgrounds in Prose- Practice and Theory 459
  • Iii. Comparisons and Conclusions 497
  • THE CONTINUITY OF ENGLISH POETIC LANGUAGE 517
  • Bibliography 537
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 542

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.