VI
Sovereignty

THE COLDUN CALF to which the most devoted and mystic adoration of the masses goes in our days is: Sovereignty. No symbol carrying the pretension of a deity, which ever got hold of mankind, caused so much misery, hatred, starvation and mass execution as the notion "Sovereignty of the Nation."

What is Sovereignty?

The appellation comes from the word "sovereign." At the time when peoples were ruled by absolute monarchs, kings, emperors, chiefs, or whatever they were called, it was necessary for them to derive their power from God in order to make people believe and accept that whatever they did, said and ordered was right, infallible and uncontrollable. These attributes were called "sovereign" and the persons vested with them were the "Sovereigns."

For many centuries people suffered under this organization of society, submitted to the uncontrolled, supreme power of monarchs.

The great change came in the eighteenth century, when under the influence of thinkers and philosophers like Locke,

-53-

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A Democratic Manifesto
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Dialogue between Confucius, (the Master) and Tsze-loo *
  • I - Men or Principles 3
  • II - Freedom 14
  • III - Liberalism 20
  • IV - Nation 31
  • V - Nationalism 38
  • VI - Sovereignty 53
  • VII - Peace 61
  • VIII - War 73
  • IX - Non-Intervention 80
  • X - Neutrality 86
  • XI - Independence 91
  • XII - Inter-dependence 97
  • XIII - Force 104
  • XIV - Aggression 109
  • XV - Preventive War 116
  • XVI - Utopia 121
  • XVII - Principles and Institutions 130
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