VII
Peace

THE THIRTY-THIRD SESSXON of the Council of the League of Nations met in March, 1925, in the modest surroundings of the dining room of the old Hotel National in Geneva. The order of the day was acceptance by the Council of the Geneva Protocol worked out by the preceding British and French Premiers, MacDonald and Herriot, on the lawns of Chequers. The hopes for a successful League of Nations were still high, and this was the first and only serious attempt to organize collective security within the framework of the League.

At this fateful meeting of the Council, Britain was represented by Sir Austen Chamberlain and France by Aristide Briand. France and all the representatives of the smaller countries at the Council were for acceptance of the Protocol, but everybody knew in advance that Sir Austen Chamberlain, in the name of his newly elected British Conservative Cabinet, would flatly reject it. His arguments were that His Majesty's Government were unable to enter into such general commitments which would tie their hands in the future, that the purpose of the League was to preserve peace

-61-

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A Democratic Manifesto
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Dialogue between Confucius, (the Master) and Tsze-loo *
  • I - Men or Principles 3
  • II - Freedom 14
  • III - Liberalism 20
  • IV - Nation 31
  • V - Nationalism 38
  • VI - Sovereignty 53
  • VII - Peace 61
  • VIII - War 73
  • IX - Non-Intervention 80
  • X - Neutrality 86
  • XI - Independence 91
  • XII - Inter-dependence 97
  • XIII - Force 104
  • XIV - Aggression 109
  • XV - Preventive War 116
  • XVI - Utopia 121
  • XVII - Principles and Institutions 130
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