Freud: A Critical Re-Evaluation of His Theories

By Reuben D. Fine | Go to book overview
or to remember their childhood, in spite of the most intensive analysis of resistances. There has been a tendency to call those who could do to any degree what Freud did analyzable and those who could not unanalyzable. This is one of the factors which has led to the many controversies about analyzability.Thus in more than one sense Freud's self-analysis is the matrix from which the whole science grew. It was here that he had the great insights which form the basis of psychoanalysis. And it was here too that he left broad gaps which he and other workers in the field were later to fill in.
Available English Translations of Freud's Works Cited in Chapter III.
An Autobiographical Study.1925.With Postscript, 1935.
Standard Edition, Vol. XX, pp. 7-70.
London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis, 1946. In The Problem of Lay Analyses (without 1935 Postscript). New York: Brentano, 1927, pp. 189-316.
Under title Autobiography. New York: Norton, 1935, 1952.

NOTES ON CHAPTER III

As mentioned in the text, the only fully adequate source for the self- analysis is D. Anzieu: L'Auto-Analyse ( Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1959), which has not yet been translated from the original French. Vol. I of Jones's biography is of course invaluable. Freud himself never described his self-analysis in any systematic manner. His An Autobiographical Study (Standard Edition, Vol. XX, pp. 7-74) covers the development of the science, but not his inner struggles.

On self-analysis since Freud, see the subsequent parts of the work by Anzieu cited above. The feasibility and limits of self-analysis are still matters of considerable dispute among analysts. For different points of view, see K. Horney: Self-Analysis ( New York: Norton, 1942). E. Pickworth Farrow : A Practical Method of Self-Analysis ( London: Allen and Unwin, 1942), also has a foreword by Freud. E. Weigert: "Counter- Transference and Self-Analysis of the Psycho-Analyst," International Journal of Psychoanalysis, XXXV, 1954, pp. 242-6. M. Kramer: "On the Continuation of the Analytic Process after Psychoanalysis (A Self- Observation)," International Journal of Psychoanalysis, XL, 1959, pp. 17-25.

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