Freud: A Critical Re-Evaluation of His Theories

By Reuben D. Fine | Go to book overview
Under title: Origin and Development of Psychoanalysis. Chicago: Henry Regnery Co. ( Gateway Editions paperback).
The Unconscious1915. Standard Edition, Vol. XIV, pp. 166-204. Collected Papers, Vol. IV, pp. 98-136.
A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis. 1916/1917. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1920. Garden City, New York: Garden City Pub. Co., 1938. New York: Perma Giants, 1949. New York: Washington Square Press (paperback) Under title: Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis. London: Allen and Unwin, 1929.

NOTES ON CHAPTER IV

For a summary of the pre-Freudian literature on the unconscious, see H. Ellenberger "The Unconscious before Freud," Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 21, 1957, 3. L. L. Whyte: The Unconscious before Freud ( New York: Basic Books, 1960) has a good historical account but attaches much too much importance to pre-Freud ian writers.

Little has been written on the theory of the unconscious since Freud, other than to state his theories in more popular language. An interesting thesis is developed in I. Matte-Blanco:"Expression in Symbolic Logic of the Characteristics of the System Ucs or the Logic of the System Ucs," International Journal of Psychoanalysis, XL, 1959, pp. 1-5.

Jung has an elaborate system of concepts relating to the unconscious which non-Jungians object to on the grounds that it makes too many dubious assumptions about inherent and inherited mental faculties. For a concise summary of the Jungian position, see J. Jacobi: The Psychology of Jung ( New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1943) and C. G. Jung: Psychological Types ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1923). Enormous advances in the clinical knowledge of dreams have accumulated since Freud. A mine of information is contained in E. Gutheil A Handbook of Dream Analysis( Liveright, 1951). Much useful material is summarized in R. Fliess: The Dream: A Post-Freudian Reader( New York: International Universities Press, 1953).

One of the most important clinical concepts since Freud is Lewin's notion of the "dream screen." See B. Lewin: "Sleep, the Mouth and the Dream Screen." Psychoanalytic Quarterly, XV, 1946, pp. 419-34. See also O. Issakower: "A Contribution to the Pathopsychology of Falling Asleep," International Journal of Psychoanalysis, XIX, 1938, pp. 331-45.

The experimental literature on dreams and unconscious perception has been systematically reported by Charles Fisher and his associates in a

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