Freud: A Critical Re-Evaluation of His Theories

By Reuben D. Fine | Go to book overview
lutely necessary. The patient cannot be expected to get better as a result of one interpretation. This working through could in more conventional psychological terms be called learning. At the same time, once this equation is made, it becomes clear that just when the patient has learned enough about himself is not something that can be specified with any great sharpness.
h. Ego structure: -- The complications created by the previous discoveries, all of which belong to the period of id psychology, were great enough; those created by the transition to ego psychology were infinitely greater. This is the topic of the 1937 paper.
The particular ways in which the ego must be reconstructed to allow one to say that the analysis has been properly terminated have engaged the attention of analysts ever since Freud's final paper. It can scarcely be said that there is any real agreement in the field, even among members of the same group. Some writers, for example, stress the capacity for self-analysis, others the resolution of the transference. The characteristics of the healthy ego could in general be said to be freedom to work, freedom to love and freedom from symptoms, but when the attempt is made to define these terms more precisely in individual cases wide disagreement results. In spite of all the discussion since 1937, analysts have not really advanced beyond Freud's fluid position that the object of analysis is to strengthen the ego.
Available English Translations of Freud's Works Cited in Chapter XII.
Neurosis and Psychosis. 1924.
Standard Edition, Vol. XIX, pp. 149-153.
Collected Papers, Vol. II, pp. 25-254.
The Loss of Reality in Neurosis and Psychosis. 1924.
Standard Edition, Vol. XIX, pp. 183-187.
Collected Papers, Vol. II, pp. 277-282.
Analysis Terminable and Interminable. 1937.
Collected Papers, Vol. V, pp. 316-357.

NOTES ON CHAPTER XII

On the development of psychoanalytic technique since Freud two crucial papers are K. Eissler: "The Effect of the Structure of the Ego on"

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