Freud: A Critical Re-Evaluation of His Theories

By Reuben D. Fine | Go to book overview

Available English Translations of Freud's Works Cited in Chapter XIII.
The Future of an Illusion. 1927. Standard Edition, Vol. XXI, pp. 5-56. New York: Liveright, 1928. London: Hogarth Press and the Institute for Psychoanalysis. 1928. Garden City, New York: Doubleday Anchor(paperback).
Civilization and Its Discontents. 1930. Standard Edition, Vol. XXI, pp. 64-145. London: Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis. 1930. New York: Cape and Smith, 1930. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, 1958. New York: Doubleday Anchor (paperback).

NOTES ON CHAPTER XIII

The general problem of the relationship between psychoanalysis and society has been much discussed since Freud's work. For some representative views from a variety of points of view: E. Fromm: The Sane Society ( New York, Rinehart, 1955) argues for a rational reorganization of society. E. Fromm: Man for Himself ( New York: Rinehart, 1947), proposes a psychoanalytic ethic. H. Marcuse: Eros and Civilization ( Boston: Beacon, 1955) attempts to portray a society in which positive feelings can receive full recognition. J. L. Halliday: Psychosocial Medicine ( New York: Norton, 1948) describes the deterioration of personality under depressing economic conditions.

R. Money-Kyrle: Psychoanalysis and Politics ( New York: Norton, 1951) is the most prominent of the orthodox psychoanalysts who have devoted their attention to this problem. H. Hartmann: Psychoanalysis and Moral Values ( New York: International Universities Press, 1960), presents a complex analysis of the problem without attempting any clear-cut conclusions.

N. Brown: Life Against Death: The Psychoanalytical Meaning of History ( Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1959) has a onesided thesis of the type which brings psychoanalysis into disrepute. L. S. Feuer: Psychoanalysis and Ethics ( Springfield, Ill.: C. C. Thomas, 1956) has a well-reasoned attempt to integrate the two fields.

A variety of interesting papers may be found in S. Hook, ed.: Psychoanalysis, Scientific Method and Philosophy. ( New York: New York University, 1959).

See also Notes on Chapters V and IX.

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