Anglo-American Literary Relations

By George Stuart Gordon | Go to book overview

of any length, and I could not much interrupt the urgent flow of his thoughts, which were concentrated mainly on his miscellaneous essays, his Shakespeare, and his Shelley. I was however able to interject an inquiry and a suggestion about the Watson Lectures. It was received with some impatience; that was unfinished work, and time pressed. Yet he admitted that the lectures were assembled and might be thought fit to print. A few days later he told his wife that I might have the manuscript to use at my discretion.

The materials entrusted to me comprised: (1) a typescript of perhaps four fifths of the whole, corrected both in ink and in pencil; (2) a duplicate typescript of most of (1), hardly corrected; (3) manuscript which had presumably not been typed (as well as most of that which had); (4) typed extracts. All these were filed, with substantial accuracy, in six folders, one for each lecture. There was also a considerable mass of raw material in notebooks and loose sheets.

The corrections in the typescript readily revealed themselves as of two kinds. The corrections in ink, for the most part verbal, clearly belong to the time of the original lectures, and there is no question of their validity. The corrections in pencil consist mainly of large deletions. These as clearly belong to the redelivery of the six lectures, in 1938, as four lectures for the Royal Institution. For my purpose, therefore, they are of no validity. There are also a large number of corrections and jottings; on these I have had to exercise editorial discretion. Most of the positive corrections were manifest improvements, and I have adopted them. The marginal hints I have had for the most part to ignore; but occasionally I have added a footnote, where I found something too good to miss.

There remained, when I had done what was obvious, some ragged edges. These I have thought it would be

-6-

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Anglo-American Literary Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Prefatory Note 5
  • Contents 8
  • I - Early American LIterature 11
  • II - The Rise of American LIterature 31
  • III - Friendship in Letters 44
  • IV - British Authors in America 62
  • V - British Authors' Copyright 82
  • VI - The LIterary Hopes of America 99
  • Index of Persons 117
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