The Late Lord Byron: Posthumous Dramas

By Doris Langley Moore | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE

Missolonghi April 20th 1824

Signor Hobhouse,

The misfortune that has befallen us is terrible and irreparable. I scarcely have words to describe it. Lord Byron is dead.

Your friend, my friend and father, the light of this century, the boast of your country, the saviour of Greece is dead.

Although this is the first time that I address myself to you, I feel that I may, through the common tie that binds us, express myself with all the confidence of an old friendship. You will already know that my Lord was struck down by an unforeseen epileptic fit only two months ago. His health however seemed to have improved, and it appeared that the fit had left not the slightest trace. Yet he was always debilitated, both as an effect of that infirmity and because of the severe abstinence which he maintained with the object of preventing a relapse.

On the 10th of this month he was caught in a violent rain while riding on horseback, according to his custom, outside the city. There followed a feverish chill. The symptoms were inflammatory -- It looked for a while as if he might have overcome it if he had submitted to the advice of his doctors who ordered him to be bled. He would not have it and the fever increased. Then he submitted, and three or four bleedings were performed, and leeches applied etc., but it was too late. . . .

What an end to his marvellous faculties, which had already borne a strain above human endurance. He died on the 19th of April at half past six in the evening.

. . . I cannot tell you the inconsolable grief of his friends -- and of the whole of Greece. In the flower of his prime, and of so many wonderful hopes. . . .

Following the advice of Prince A. Mavrocordato and the leading English people who are to be found here, and because of our long and entire confidence, I have thought myself bound to take on the administration and care of everything connected with him. His papers and his more valuable belongings were sealed immediately after his death -- and will be opened in the presence of Prince Mavrocordato and the principal people here. An inventory will be made.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Late Lord Byron: Posthumous Dramas
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 542

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.