this was the first which he saw fit to preserve, and clearly he regarded his career as a playwright as beginning with it. In the following year he followed it with his second important play, Every Man out of his Humour. Put on, like its predecessor, by Shakespeare's company (according to tradition it was Shakespeare who first recognized Jonson's gifts and urged his fellows to employ him) Every Man out of his Humour had an even greater success. Jonson made it something like a manifesto of his artistic intentions, and published it in 1600--the first of his plays to see print-- with the air of offering a sample of a new art-form. From that time onwards his position as a major dramatist was recognized, though not for a long time was it unchallenged.


II

Jonson was a proud and self-confident man. Circumstances might force him to take up play-writing, a despised occupation looked down on by the scholars and gentlemen among whom he felt his right place to be: very well, he would make it his business to render it an accepted and valued profession. Time and again he asserts the high place of Poetry, which for him meant all forms of creative writing. One of the earliest and also one of his finest defences occurs in the original version of Every Man in his Humour. A father tries to dissuade his son from writing by pointing out to him how low a place poets and poetry hold in the world's opinion, and the son bursts out:

Opinion, O God let grosse opinion
Sinck & be damnd as deepe as Barathrum.
If it may stand with your most wisht content,
I can refell opinion, and approve
The state of poesie, such as it is,
Blessed, æternall, and most true devine:
Indeede if you will looke on Poesie,

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ben Jonson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Chapter I 5
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 25
  • Chapter V 36
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 43

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.