Hamlin Garland's Early Work and Career

By Donald Pizer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
REFORMING THE THEATER (1889-1891)

THE STAGE was one of Garland's lifelong interests. As a youth in Iowa he had played a leading role in amateur theatricals, and during his early years in Boston, Edwin Booth's Shakespearean interpretations occupied him greatly. Once he began constructing his critical system, the drama became something more than that which attracted his native love of the theater. It was now another art to reform, to put into step with evolution by having it deal with contemporary American subjects. By early 1886 he was commenting in his notebook that "the drama is following the lead of the novel and from the romantic is becoming realistic. The present is being studied."1

Although Garland's interest in the drama remained high during 1886-1888, he did not participate in dramatic affairs, nor did he seem to get very far in attempts at playwriting.2 In 1889- 1891, however, he made several contributions to the history of American drama. He influenced one of our earliest dramatists of ideas, helped create interest in Ibsen and other European playwrights, took the lead in organizing America's first independent theater, and himself wrote realistic social dramas.

The initial and most important stimulus for these activities was Garland's close friendship with James A. Herne. Garland saw Herne and his wife Katherine in Herne Drifting Apart in early January, 1889. Although the play contained characteristics of a sentimental temperance lecture, it also had two qualities that particularly appealed to Garland: a naturalness and simplicity in the husband-wife relationship and a local-color setting on the Massachusetts coast. When he wrote to Herne praising the play, Herne in his reply promised a meeting when his season was over.3 Then, in a Letter to the Editor of the

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hamlin Garland's Early Work and Career
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.