Hamlin Garland's Early Work and Career

By Donald Pizer | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION
1. The Economic Novel in America ( Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 1942), pp. 149, 329.
2. "The Passing of the Frontier," Dial, LXVII ( Oct. 4, 1919), 286.

CHAPTER II: DEVELOPMENT OF A LITERARY CREED
1. Three of Garland's autobiographies survey his early career: SMB ( New York: Macmillan, 1917); A Daughter of the Middle Border ( New York: Macmillan, 1921); and RM ( New York: Macmillan, 1930). These volumes and Garland's numerous autobiographical articles are an important source of biographical information. In his accounts of his early career, however, Garland relied primarily on memory, and whatever color and warmth this may have lent to his recollections, it lessened their usefulness as accurate records of his movements, activities, and ideas. I have therefore tended to rely on contemporary records (magazines and newspapers; letters, notebooks, and manuscripts) for particular information, though Garland's autobiographies nevertheless constitute the tacit foundation of my biographical account. Since I see no point in quarreling with his recollections in detail after detail, I have not, except for important matters, referred to the numerous differences between contemporary records and Garland's recollections.
2. SMB, p. 192.
3. Ibid., p. 224.
4. Garland voiced a characteristic conception (for himself and for many of his generation) of Spencer's importance in a review of Alfred Wallace Natural Selection in the Arena, IV ( Oct., 1891), xxv. He wrote: "Great as were Darwin's discoveries, or Tyndaws or Huxley's, they were all included within the mighty circle of Herbert Spencer's thought, and any new discoveries to be made will still be within the limits of his preempted territory. While Darwin and Wallace studied animal life, and the configuration of the globe, and the derivation of man, to Herbert Spencer had come the grandest intellectual conception ever wrought out in a human brain,--the conception of the law of progress."
5. SMB, p. 323.
6. Garland preserved the invitation card printed for the lectures by pasting it into his May 15, 1885, notebook. It reads:

Three Evenings in Literature and Expression.

Studies by Hamlin Garland,

( Graduate of Boston School of Oratory),

1st Evening, "Victor Hugo and His Prose Masterpieces."

2d Evening, "Edwin Booth as a Master of Expression."

3d Evening, "Some German and American Novels."

at Mrs. J. Wentworth Payson's,

136 Fairmount Avenue, Hyde Park,

Monday Eve'gs, July 13, 20 27, at 7:45 o'clock.

Three Evenings, $1.00 One Evening, 50 cents.

7. Garland's notes on Taine History of English Literature fill two large undated ledger notebooks. One is signed " H. Garland. Ordway, Dakota"; the other, " Hamlin Garland. McPherson Co., Dakota."
8. Sholom J. Kahn, Science and Aesthetic Judgment: A Study in Taine's Critical Method ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1953), p. 23.

-175-

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