Experiment in Independence: New Jersey in the Critical Period, 1781-1789

By Richard P. McCormick | Go to book overview

II
The Plight of the Loyalists

THE termination of the war with England also brought to a decisive conclusion the internecine strife between whigs and tories that characterized the American Revolution. Victory for the cause of independence meant defeat for those who had openly or covertly opposed the break with the mother country. One of the immediate problems New Jersey faced, therefore, as it hailed the arrival of peace, was to determine what policies should be adopted toward those present and former citizens who had refused to participate in rebellion. Should such individuals be permitted to resume their former positions in society? What disposition should be made of the forfeited estates of avowed loyalists? The future political and civil status of the tories, too, was in doubt. It was to be more than a decade before these issues were fully resolved, and in the meantime the embers of internal dissension continued to smolder.


HOSTILITY AND HOSPITALITY

For many who had chosen to stand by their king, peace brought financial ruin and the dreary prospect of beginning

-25-

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Experiment in Independence: New Jersey in the Critical Period, 1781-1789
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Key to Abbreviations xiii
  • I - Introduction to Independence 3
  • II - The Plight of the Loyalists 25
  • III - Social and Cultural Reconstruction 40
  • IV - Politics: the Rules and the Game 69
  • V - Business and the Government 103
  • VI - The Landed Interest 135
  • VII - Money: the Era of Deflation 158
  • VIII - Money: the Familiar Remedy 186
  • IX - New Jersey and the Confederation 218
  • X - New Jersey and the Constitution 252
  • XI - The Counterrevolution 280
  • XII - Conclusion 304
  • Appendix I - Record of Tax Receipts, 1784-17901 307
  • Appendix II - Record of Interest Payments, 1784-17891 308
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 327
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