Experiment in Independence: New Jersey in the Critical Period, 1781-1789

By Richard P. McCormick | Go to book overview

V
Business and the Government

A FLEXIBLE and independent government, responsive to popular pressures, encouraged different economic groups in the state to solicit legislation favorable to their interests. Merchants, landowners, security holders, and debtors all sought to influence public policy through the available political channels. The small but enterprising business community, free from British mercantilistic restraints but at the same time conscious of the existence of formidable barriers to economic progress, was especially concerned with the promotion of measures that would foster the development of commerce. Although little help could be expected from the impotent Congress of the Confederation, the legislature, it seemed, might do much to stimulate foreign trade by enacting appropriate regulations. A variety of proposals were advanced by the mercantile element to accomplish the desired objective, but these plans won only incomplete acceptance and were foredoomed to failure. The experience served to emphasize New Jersey's dependence on New York and Philadelphia markets and to accent the need for vesting in the central government comprehensive and exclusive authority over commerce.

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Experiment in Independence: New Jersey in the Critical Period, 1781-1789
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Key to Abbreviations xiii
  • I - Introduction to Independence 3
  • II - The Plight of the Loyalists 25
  • III - Social and Cultural Reconstruction 40
  • IV - Politics: the Rules and the Game 69
  • V - Business and the Government 103
  • VI - The Landed Interest 135
  • VII - Money: the Era of Deflation 158
  • VIII - Money: the Familiar Remedy 186
  • IX - New Jersey and the Confederation 218
  • X - New Jersey and the Constitution 252
  • XI - The Counterrevolution 280
  • XII - Conclusion 304
  • Appendix I - Record of Tax Receipts, 1784-17901 307
  • Appendix II - Record of Interest Payments, 1784-17891 308
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.