Wilkie Collins: A Biography

By Kenneth Robinson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN " Household Words"

DURING THE MONTHS following the performance of The Frozen Deep, while Wilkie was at work on The Dead Secret, Dickens was straining to finish Little Dorrit on schedule. Restless and dispirited he sought Wilkie's company more and more. The letters of this period make frequent reference to dinners together at the Household Words office, jaunts into the country and, later, visits to Dickens' new home near Rochester, Gad's Hill Place, of which he took possession in May. He writes to Wilkie in March, 1857:

I cannot tell you what pleasure I had in the receipt of your letter yesterday evening, or how much good it did me in the depression consequent upon an exciting and exhausting day's work. I immediately arose (like the desponding Princes in the Arabian Nights, when the old woman--Procuress evidently, and probably of French extraction--comes to whisper about the Princesses they love) and washed my face and went out; and my face has been shining ever since.

Ellis [proprietor of a Brighton hotel] responds to my letter that rooms shall be ready! There is a train at 12 which appears to me to be the train for the distinguished visitors. If you will call for me in a cab at about 20 minutes past 11, my hand will be on the latch of the door.

I have got a book to take with me of which I have not read a line, but which I have been saving up to get a pull at it in the nature of a draught--The Dead Secret--by a Fellow Student.

In May Little Dorrit is finished and Wilkie is informed that 'any mad proposal you please will find a wildly insane response in Yours ever, C.D.' And a week or so later Dickens writes :

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wilkie Collins: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • List of Illustrations 8
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 9
  • Foreword 10
  • Chapter One - William Collins R.A. 11
  • Chapter Two - Early Years 24
  • Chapter Three - Literary Beginnings 44
  • Chapter Four - the Dickens Circle 59
  • Chapter Five - Grand Tour 73
  • Chapter Six - Amateur Theatricals 88
  • Chapter Seven - " Household Words" 110
  • Chapter Eight Caroline 128
  • Chapter Nine "The Woman in White" 137
  • Chapter Ten "No Name" 155
  • Chapter Eleven "Armadale" 175
  • Chapter Twelve "The Moonstone" 200
  • Chapter Thirteen Turning Point 225
  • Chapter Fourteen American Journey 249
  • Chapter Fifteen Downhill 275
  • Chapter Sixteen Last Years 295
  • Chapter Seventeen Post Mortem 323
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY I 335
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY II 338
  • Index 341
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.