The Odd Women

By George Gissing ; Patricia Ingham | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF GEORGE GISSING
1857 Born in Wakefield, Yorkshire (22 November); his father, Thomas
Gissing is a pharmacist, who dies when George is 13.
1872 Wins scholarship to Owens College, Manchester; a Multiple prize-
winner, clearly destined for a successful academic career.
1876 Meets prostitute Marianne Helen ('Nell') Harrison (31 May);
caught stealing money in college to further plan to save Nell from
prostitution; expelled and stripped of honours, he serves one
month's imprisonment; sails for America (September), where he
supports himself by teaching and, latterly, short-story writing.
1877 Returns to England (October) and begins life in London; lives with
Nell Harrison; publishes short stories written in America and
begins first novel, unpublished.
1879 Having come of age he receives £300 from his aunt's estate; marries
Nell (27 October); finishes Workers in the Dawn.
1880 Workers in the Dawn published; gets to know leading positivist
Frederic Harrison and for four years tutors his sons.
1882 Separates from wife, now alcoholic; rejects positivism and writes
essay, 'The Hope of Pessimism', much influenced by
Schopenhauer.
1884 Publication of The Unclassed (June) marks real beginning of his
career as a novelist.
1886 Demos published to generally favourable reviews, but he is living in
constant poverty; manages first visit to France; Isabel Clarendon
published.
1887 Thyrza published.
1888 Death of Nell (February); A Life's Morning published; visits Italy
for first time and is overwhelmed.
1889 The Nether World published; visits Greece.
1890 Meets Edith Underwood (September); The Emancipated published.
1891 Marries Edith (25 February); moves to Exeter; New Grub Street
published (April), to acclaim; son Walter born (10 December).
1892 Denzil Quarrier and Born in Exile published.
1893 Returns to London (June); The Odd Women published.
1894 Moves to Epsom (September); In the Year of Jubilee published;

-xxx-

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The Odd Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • THE ODD WOMEN i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vi
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxvi
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxviii
  • A CHRONOLOGY OF GEORGE GISSING xxx
  • Contents 4
  • 1 - The Fold and the Shepherd 5
  • 2 - Adrift 11
  • 3 - An Independent Woman 25
  • 4 - Monica's Majority 31
  • 5 - The Casual Acquaintance 46
  • 6 - A Camp of the Reserve 59
  • 7 - A Social Advance 72
  • 8 - Cousin Everard 87
  • 9 - The Simple Faith 100
  • 10 - First Principles 110
  • 11 - At Nature's Bidding 120
  • 12 - Weddings 130
  • 13 - Discord of Leaders 142
  • 14 - Motives Meeting 155
  • 15 - The Joys of Home 167
  • 16 - Health from the Sea 181
  • 17 - The Triumph 194
  • 18 - A Reinforcement 209
  • 19 - The Clank of the Chains 219
  • 20 - The First Lie 227
  • 21 - Towards the Decisive 235
  • 22 - Honour in Difficulties 247
  • 23 - In Ambush 262
  • 24 - Tracked 271
  • 25 - The Fate of the Ideal 281
  • 26 - The Unideal Tested 297
  • 27 - The Reascent 310
  • 28 - The Burden of Futile Souls 325
  • 29 - Confession and Counsel 338
  • 30 - Retreat with Honour 352
  • 31 - A New Beginning 362
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 372
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