CHAPTER VII
EUROPE: 1866-1867

AFTER I had been five years at Mr. Dixwell's school it was decided by the family authorities that we should all go to Europe, all including my mother, my sister and her husband, Mr. George Abbot James, to whom she had been married three years before, and myself. As I was to enter Harvard the following year, it was necessary that my studies should not be interrupted, and my mother, therefore, secured as my tutor to go with us Constant Davis, who was the eldest son of Rear-Admiral Davis, and whose mother was her second cousin as well as a lifelong and most intimate friend. Of Admiral Davis I shall have much to say later and will say no more here. But of my tutor Constant Davis I must speak now, for he was, although unhappily only for a short time, one of the best, one of the most fortunate and most salutary influences which ever came into my life. He had graduated from Harvard in the class of 1864, taking high rank. He had been very popular in his class and had indeed inspired an affection and admiration among some of its members, whom he knew best, quite unusual for so young a man. He was a gentleman in the highest and best sense of the word, as intrepid morally as he was physically, a scholar, a lover of literature, with an exhaustless fund of humor, and a charming companion. It was his intention to become a lawyer, and he had begun to study for the bar when his health became impaired and the first signs of con-

-135-

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Early Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I- Heredity 3
  • Chapter II- Earliest Memories- 1850-1860 14
  • Chapter III- The "Olympians"- 1850-1860 39
  • Chapter IV- Boyhood- 1860-1867 59
  • Chapter V- Boyhood--My Last School- 1860-1867 81
  • Chapter VI- The War- 1860-1865 112
  • Chapter VII- Europe- 1866-1867 135
  • Chapter VIII- Harvard- 1867-1871 180
  • Chapter IX- Retrospect and Contrast 200
  • Chapter X- Europe Again- 1871-1872 225
  • Chapter XI- Starting in Life- 1873-1880 244
  • Index 353
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