CHAPTER XI
STARTING IN LIFE: 1873-1880

AFTER the great good fortune which came to me by my selection for the assistant editorship of the North American Review, I had no further reason to complain of lack of employment. My depression departed. I no longer felt that I was laboring in an objectless, purposeless fashion. In fact, I am rather surprised as I look back at the many interests which sprang up about me and at the amount of work which, for better or worse, I managed to do. But work, after all, is the best of friends. I believe that it is one secret of health. Without it one can never enjoy either leisure or a vacation, and work, free from anxiety, is always a tonic, and in some of the darkest hours an anodyne. I do not believe that it ever did any one anything but good, provided that a man takes plenty of exercise, which I have always done, riding at all seasons, hunting in the autumn, and in summer living in or on the water, and always varying my amusements out-of-doors by much walking and by the simple labor of chopping and sawing wood.

My duties on the North American Review began at once. I read manuscripts and proof and aided Mr. Adams in every way in preparing each number for the press. I learned much in this manner from my chief's instruction as to methods of criticism and also as to style. Very early in my apprenticeship I remember his handing to me an article by an eminent local historian and antiquary, and saying: "We

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Early Memories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I- Heredity 3
  • Chapter II- Earliest Memories- 1850-1860 14
  • Chapter III- The "Olympians"- 1850-1860 39
  • Chapter IV- Boyhood- 1860-1867 59
  • Chapter V- Boyhood--My Last School- 1860-1867 81
  • Chapter VI- The War- 1860-1865 112
  • Chapter VII- Europe- 1866-1867 135
  • Chapter VIII- Harvard- 1867-1871 180
  • Chapter IX- Retrospect and Contrast 200
  • Chapter X- Europe Again- 1871-1872 225
  • Chapter XI- Starting in Life- 1873-1880 244
  • Index 353
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