The Elements of Scientific Psychology

By Knight Dunlap | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS
FIG.PAGE
1. Taste tetrahedron51
2. Color triangle59
3. Color hexahedron61
4. Wave motion in the ether63
5. Scheme of spectrum production64
6. Diagram of a typical prismatic spectrum of sunlight65
7. Color sensitivity of the normal eye67
8. Color sensitivity of the dichromatic eye77
9. Wave form of pure tone81
10. The wave form of an organ-pipe tone (reedless oboe, middle C, 260 v. s.), with its harmonic partials83
11. Scheme of a complex tone91
12. Scheme of reaction pathways commencing in retinal receptors182
13. Scheme of reaction pathways terminating in muscles producing finger movement183
14. Scheme of pathways involved in the knee jerk, and in the accompanying perceptual reactions191
15. Practice curve for adding machine232
16. Typical pathways covered by a rat in a maze on successive trials in learning to reach food in the center236
17. Scheme of the pathways and interconnections involved in the development of the perception of an orange241
18. Hidden figures. An illustration of the effects of previous reactions in determining the indirect factors in perception243
19. Shadows is signs of depth270
20. Linear perspective271
21 Angular perspective, foreshortening and intervention273
22. Aerial perspective274
23. Aerial perspective275
24. Direction of eye movements in horizontal nystagmus285
25. Poggendorf's figure292
26. Zöllner's figure293
27. Reversible perspective figures294
28. Jastrow's figure295
29. Muller-Lyer's figure296
30. Dunlap's figure296
31. Scheme of the pathways involved in the learning of a series of nonsense syllables305

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