The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs

By Warren G. Findley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
The Impact of Testing Programs on College Preparation and Attendance

PAUL I. CLIFFORD and JOSHUA A. FISHMAN


Introduction

In considering the impact of college-selection testing programs on college preparation and attendance, it is necessary, first, to make explicit four notions which are relevant to the discussion which follows, but which might be overlooked if they were not specifically identified. The first of these is that college-selection testing programs are means which may contribute to the attainment of either desirable or undesirable ends, depending on whether they are used properly or improperly. The discussion which follows presumes that those who use data derived from college-selection testing programs seek to use them for relevant and proper purposes. To put it another way, it is assumed that users of data derived from college-selection testing programs employ test results to facilitate the emergence of potentially worthwhile intellectual outcomes and to eliminate or reduce any potentially deleterious effects.

Secondly, college-selection testing programs generally assay only those aspects of behavior which are most responsive to objective measurement and quantification. These are the domains of academic aptitude or, more precisely, of developed mental ability or academic achievement. The restrictions which are placed upon college-selection testing programs by limitation to these domains must be borne in mind in the discussion which follows.

The third point is that the data which are yielded by college- selection testing programs constitute only one kind of evidence concerning the degree to which a given applicant is likely to succeed in a given institution of higher education. Data yielded by college-selection testing programs must supplement and be supple-

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Impact and Improvement of School Testing Programs
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.