Television's Impact on American Culture

By William Y. Elliott | Go to book overview

Any adequate remedy through change in public policy must look to clearer legislative standards for determining the content of the "public service" features required of broadcasting stations, as well as some more definite injunctions to reserve at least an hour of evening listening time between say 6:30 and 11:30 p.m. for defined educational features. If the Federal Communications Commission were enjoined by Congress to seek the advice of educational authorities, perhaps the proposed National Council for Educational Television might usefully serve this advisory function.

But beyond law and official public policy is the as yet not occupied area of community and private effort to create an adequately financed National Council to act along independent lines: This challenge can be met only by setting up a really competitive national production and programming service, available to all stations but especially to ETV stations. It must be one that is more adequate to the need than the present Ann Arbor Center. Such an improvement requires private as well as public support, especially that of the Foundations, and not merely a continued dependence even on the princely gifts of the Ford Foundation.

These chapters by the Editor are intended as summary notes on his own points of emphasis. The reader will find the evidence, in rich detail, in the chapters and the appendices that follow. At the very least it will give any student who is interested enough to follow it through, the most comprehensive basis for understanding television and its educational impact that is yet available.


NOTES
1.
This point is more adequately treated in the chapters by Robert Glynn and by Governor Bradford, and in recent work by Charles Thompson, Television and the Presidential Nominating Conventions, Brookings Institution, 1956.
2.
See the very interesting and on the whole rather critically unfavorable report on teaching by television as contrasted to direct class room contacts contained in An Investigation of Closed-Circuit Television for Teaching University Courses published by the Pennsylvania State University, July 31, 1955.
3.
See An Investigation of Closed-Circuit Television for Teaching University Courses (supported by the Fund for the Advancement of Education) previously cited ( Pennsylvania State University, 1955).
4.
See From Boom to Bust in TV Teaching--In One Year, A Report of Developments in Teaching by Television in the District of Columbia Public Schools, by Carl F. Hansen, Assistant Superintendent, Public Schools of the District of Columbia, September, 1955.
5.
For the efforts by Michigan State University to explore this promising avenue of combining educational hours with profitable commercial operation, see page 92, in Chapter 3 by Leo A. Martin.
6.
See "Educational Television Suffers a Second Defeat" (original title "The Second Defeat of TV") by R. L. Shayon in the Saturday Review of Literature, March 17, 1956, reprinted as Appendix F in this volume.

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