Television's Impact on American Culture

By William Y. Elliott | Go to book overview

year terms by the president of the NARTB, subject to confirmation by the Television Board of Directors. Its responsibilities include, among others, the defining and interpreting of words and phrases in the Code, the maintenance of appropriate liaison with responsible organizations, institutions and the public, as well as the screening and clearing of correspondence concerning television programming.

In addition to the substantive provisions of the Code contained in the present volume, the details of the regulatory and procedural functions of the Code and the Code Review Board may be found in the volume entitled Regulations and Procedures of the Television Code. For convenience--the headings specified therein are: I Name; II Purposes of the Code; III Subscribers; IV Affiliate Subscribers; V Rates; and VI The Television Code Review Board.


APPENDIX C
Television: The New Cyclops1

Tel-e-vi-sion:--the transmission or reproduction of a view or scene, especially of persons or objects in motion, by any device which converts light rays into electrical waves and reconverts these into visible light rays.--Webster's New International Dictionary of the English Language.

That's one definition. There are dozens, maybe hundreds, of less official ones. Television has been called a "miracle"--of electronics, of entertainment, of communication, of merchandising. It has also been called a "monster"--in all the same fields.

In less than a decade, the home screen has absorbed so important a part of our lives that it's already difficult to remember how our living patterns may have changed. There are very few places in the U.S. that are still "TV-free"--and it's almost impossible to find substantial numbers of people who haven't been influenced to some degree.


THE WORLD OF CYCLOPS

"The influence is so strong," says a television executive ruefully, "that you can taste it--whether you can measure it or not. Everybody's articulate about

____________________
1
Excerpt from Business Week, March 10, 1956, by permission of the Managing Editor and McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, Inc.

-340-

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