The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

By W. Stevenson Smith | Go to book overview
LIST OF PLATES
1
(A) Pottery bowl from Mesaeed. Predynastic. Diameter 19.4n cm : 7⅝ in. Boston, Museum of Fine Arts (Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
(B) Ivory figures. Predynastic. Height of largest c. 6 cm : 2⅜ in. Baltimore, Walters Art Gallery (Courtesy Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore)
2 Pottery hippopotamus. Predynastic. Length 26 cm : 10¼ in. Boston, Museum of Fine Arts (Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
3 Slate jackal from El Ahaiwah. Predynastic. Length 40 cm : 15¾ in. Berkeley, Museum of Anthropology, University of California (Courtesy Museum of Anthropology, University of California)
4 Basalt figure. Predynastic. Height 39 cm : 15½ in. Oxford, Ashmolean Museum ( Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 1b)
5 Ivory figure from Hierakonpolis. Late Pre- dynastic -- Dynasty I. Height c. 10 cm : 4 in. Philadelphia, University Museum (Courtesy University Museum, University of Pennsylvania)
6 Fragment of slate palette. Predynastic. Louvre ( Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 30a)
7 Narmer Palette. Dynasty I. Cairo Museum ( Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 29b)
8 Superstructure of Tomb 3038, Saqqara. Dynasty I (Courtesy W. B. Emery)
9
(A) Schist bowl from Saqqara. Diameter 61 cm : 24 in. Dynasty I. Cairo Museum (Courtesy W. B. Emery)
(B) Steatite disk from Saqqara. Dynasty I. Diameter 8.7 cm : 3½ in. Cairo Museum ( W. B. Emery , The Tomb of Hemaka, frontispiece)
(C) Cylinder seal from Naga-ed-Dêr. Predynastic. Museum of Anthropology, University of California (Photo courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
10
(A) Painted Syrian jar from Abusir. Dynasty I. Height 23 cm : 9 in. Leipzig, Ägyptologisches Institut ( H. Bonnet, Ein frühgeschichtliches Gráberfeld bei Abusir,plate 27)
(B) Two sides of inlaid wooden box lid from Abydos. Dynasty I. Oxford, Ashmolean Museum (Courtesy Ashmolean Museum, Oxford)
II
(A) Jewellery from Tomb of Zer, Abydos. Dynasty I. Cairo Museum (Photo courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
(B) Gold jewellery from Naga-ed-Dêr. Dynasty I. Cairo Museum (Photo courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)
12
(A) Seated limestone figure, front. Dynasty I-II. Cairo Museum (Courtesy Cairo Museum)
(B) Seated limestone figure, back (Courtesy Cairo Museum)
13 Painted niche stone, Saqqara. Dynasty II (Courtesy W. B. Emery)
14 Niche stone, Saqqara. Dynasty II (Courtesy W. B. Emery)
15
(A) Limestone statue of Zoser. Dynasty III. Height 140 cm : 55 in. Cairo Museum ( Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 2c)
(B) Slate seated statue of Kha-sekhem. Dynasty II. Height 56 cm : 22 in. Cairo Museum ( Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 2d)
16
(A) Model of Step Pyramid group of Zoser at Saqqara. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
(B) Detail, model of Step Pyramid group (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
17
(A) Reconstruction of South Building, Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
(B) Reconstruction, entrance hall of Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
18
(A) Actual façade of South Building. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
(B) Papyrus columns, North Building of Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
19
(A) Column capital, Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
(B) False door in South Tomb of Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
20
(A) Head of Zoser, false-door panel in South Tomb, Zoser group. Dynasty III (Courtesy J.-P. Lauer)
(B) Relief fragment from Zoser shrine, Heliopolis. Dynasty III. Turin, Museo Egizio (Courtesy Museo Egizio, Turin)
21
(A) The layer pyramid at Zawiyet el Aryan. Dynasty III (Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

-xi-

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