The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt

By W. Stevenson Smith | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1
1.

H. Frankfort, The Art and Architecture of the Ancient Orient ( Pelican History of Art, Harmonds- worth, 1954), plates 42 and 43.

p. 2

2.

Frankfort, op. cit., plate 69A.

p. 3

3. Sir Arthur Evans, The Palace of Minos, I ( London, 1921), 529, figure 385.
4. Frankfort, op. cit., plate 74.
5.

The Greek form Tuthmosis has been used here instead of the Egyptian Djehuty-mes ( Thoth is born), although a private name which also includes that of the god whom the Greeks called Thoth will be found as Djehuty-hetep ( Thoth is gracious). On the other hand, the same initial sound of the word is represented by another letter in the names of the kings Zer and Zoser. The writer is only too conscious of these inconsistencies, but has tried to present frequently used forms of names which can be easily recognized. Again the classical royal names Menes, Cheops, Chephren, and Mycerinus have been employed. The absence of vowels and the lack of general agreement as to usage in a language where the vocalization is uncertain have made uniformity impossible. The reader is referred to the admirable discussion of the transcription of Egyptian proper names in Sir Alan Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar ( London, 1950), 434.

p. 6

6.

See H. Frankfort, Kingship and the Gods ( Chicago, 1948); Ancient Egyptian Religion ( New York, 1948); J. Vandier, La Religion égyptienne, 2nd ed. ( Paris, 1949).

p. 8


CHAPTER 2
1.

Helene J. Kantor, "The Final Phase of Predynastic Culture: Gerzean or Semainian (?)", J.N.E.S., 3 ( 1944), 110. The problem was avoided by the terms Nagadah I and II, derived from the site where the succession of the material was first recognized and applied to Amratian and Gerzean.

p. 11

2.

W. C. Hayes, The Scepter of Egypt, 1 ( New York, 1953), 27.

p. 12

3. B. V. Bothmer, Bull. M.F.A., 46 ( 1948), 64.
4. G. A. Reisner, The Development of the Egyptian Tomb ( Cambridge, 1936), 378, figure 188.
5.

W. S. Smith, A History of Egyptian Sculpture and Painting in the Old Kingdom, 2nd ed. ( Boston, 1949), 7.

p. 13

6.

George Steindorff, Catalogue of the Egyptian Sculpture in the Walters Art Gallery ( Baltimore, 1946), 19, plate i.

p. 14

7. For example, the small seated figure of a dwarf or a child, Zaki Saad, Royal Excavations at Helwan, Supplement14, Annales ( 1951), plate xlii. For this early material in general, see J. Vandier, Manuel d'archéologie égyptienne, I ( Paris, 1952), 527, 533, 957; Smith, op. cit., 1, 110; Jean Capart, Primitive Art in Egypt ( London, 1905).
8. Kantor, op. cit, 111; Brunton in Studies Presented to F. Ll. Griffith ( London, 1932), 272.
9.

W. M. F. Petrie, Abydos, I ( London, 1903), plate l, 23.

p. 15

10. J. E. Quibell and F. W. Green, Hierakonpolis, II ( London, 1902), plates lxxv-lxxix, 21.
11. Capart, op. cit., figures 171 and 172; cf. figures 169-85 for the group of palettes and 186-9 for the two Hierakonpolis mace-heads; also Quibell, Hierakonpolis, I ( London, 1900), plate xxvia for a third mace-head.
12.

Smith, Sculpture and Painting, plate 29.

p. 18

13. Capart, op. cit., figure 176 and figure 182, which is the other face of our Plate 6.
14. E. Ayrton, C. Currelly, A. Weigall, Abydos, III ( London, 1904), plates vi, vii.
15. G. A. Reisner, Tomb Development, 271, figure 166.
16. See particularly H. Frankfort, American Journal of Semitic Languages, 58 ( 1941), 329, where Mesopotamian influence upon Egyptian brick architecture is strongly argued.
17. Although no very satisfactory explanation has yet been given why mats lashed to wooden frames should be associated with the recessed elements of an Egyptian brick wall, the painted imitation of such matwork on the narrow surfaces of the brick niches is apparently as early as the first use of the brick construction. Frankfort doubted this before the discovery at Saqqara of painted designs of Dynasty I which are like those of the better preserved example in the Dynasty III tomb of Hesy-ra;

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.