Art, Mind, and Brain: A Cognitive Approach to Creativity

By Howard Gardner | Go to book overview

9
THE CHILD AS ARTIST

IN CENTURIES PAST, there would have been little dispute in Western societies about how an individual enters the arts: the route was well defined. Among those relatively few individuals blessed with talent, and readily distinguished from the rest at an early age, some would elect (or be selected) to follow a life in art. They would then begin an arduous process by first enrolling, formally or informally, in a school, workshop, or atelier. There they would work with individuals of undisputed artistic achievement and learn the basic principles of their craft-- how to draw from life, how to mix colors, how to employ light, shading, and other effects. Over a period of time, and given the requisite effort, they would pass through a number of stages, ranked roughly as apprentice, journeyman, expert, and master. At the conclusion of this process, which might take years or even decades, they would be designated as artists by their community and would be allowed, in turn, to disseminate their hard-earned knowledge to others.

This picture is, of course, an idealization; probably at no time was the path from talented youth to acknowledged master artist that well defined--quite possibly risk and uncertainty have always marked the life (if not the very definition) of an artist. But such an ideal portrait does convey one very important feature: the attainment of artistry was acknowledged by virtually all individuals to be an arduous and time-consuming process, one that could be achieved only by a few after many years of training. Any thought that the attainment of artistry was easy, or that the young child might properly be viewed as an artist, would have been cursorily dismissed.

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Art, Mind, and Brain: A Cognitive Approach to Creativity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.