China and the Major Powers in East Asia

By A. Doak Barnett | Go to book overview

PART THREE
China and the United States

ALTHOUGH today the primary foreign policy goal of Peking's leaders is to counter the threat that they perceive Moscow posing to China, for most of the past quarter century Mao and his colleagues were preoccupied by their conflict with the United States. From the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950 until 1971, Sino-American confrontation was, in fact, the dominant factor shaping international relationships in the Far East. The Shanghai communiqué of 1972 marked the end of that confrontation and symbolized a major shift in the world balance. Like the signing of the Sino-Soviet alliance in 1950 and the development of the Peking-Moscow split in the 1960s it had far-reaching international repercussions. Both Peking and Washington now stress their commitment to move, step by step, toward full normalization of relations. The two countries have forged new links that are significant but still fairly fragile. Difficult problems continue to block the establishment of full diplomatic ties. Moreover, Peking and Washington are still divided by deep ideological, cultural, and political differences, very different world perspectives, and basic disagreement on a large number of global issues.

The Sino-Soviet split was clearly the primary factor leading to U.S.- China détente in the early 1970s. More than anything else, China's fear of Soviet intentions and its desire to create counterweights to restrain Moscow induced Peking's leaders to alter their policy toward the United States. And recognition that Sino-Soviet conflict had ended the bipolarity of forces in East Asia was a basic factor impelling leaders in Washington to reassess their policy toward China.

-153-

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China and the Major Powers in East Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Note on Chinese and Japanese Names xiv
  • INTRODUCTION China -- A New Major Power 1
  • PART ONE China and the Soviet Union 20
  • PART TWO China and Japan 88
  • PART THREE China and the United States 153
  • PART FOUR China and the New Four-Power Equilibrium 253
  • Sources 335
  • Index Of Authors Cited 403
  • General Index 409
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