Dialogue and Literature: Apostrophe, Auditors, and the Collapse of Romantic Discourse

By Michael Macovski | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

If on some level critics always write about their own lives, then this book reflects my own history of dialogue -- my critical engagements with readers, texts, and listeners. First among these respondents was Andrew L. Griffin, who originally sparked the idea behind this study, and then guided it through formulation, development, and completion. It was he who not only encouraged my interest in literary auditors, but also inspired my love of Romantic literature.

Both during and after this initial writing, Frederick Crews stood out as another crucial supporter of this book, as mentor, advisor, and teacher. Early incarnations of the text were also enriched by discussion and friendship with Vincent Dunn, Pamela Ferguson, Annette Lareau, Victoria Smith, and Gina Sosinsky. Finally, during the last stages of revision and rethinking, Caryl Emerson engaged my argument with insight, warmth, and vigor. I have been amazed at her ability to combine humane exchange and "active understanding" in the true spirit of dialogic criticism.

Indeed, since critical discourse is at least as interactive as the literature discussed in this study, I also want to thank the scholars whose work often influenced mine, including Stuart Curran, Don H. Bialostosky, Michael Holquist, Paul Magnuson, Beth Newman, Gary Saul Morson, Charles Rzepka, and Susan Wolfson. These voices resonate through many parts of this work in ways that no customary modes of citation can capture.

All of these wise friends and scholars were generous enough to point out the critical path; how I finally made my way is a matter of my own responsibility.

My other debts extend beyond language. They are owed to Deborah Tannen.

-vii-

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