The View from on the Road: The Rhetorical Vision of Jack Kerouac

By Omar Swartz | Go to book overview

Preface

Jack Kerouac was a colorful figure who lived an intense and destructive life. The warmth of his fire, while it consumed him, cheers us by keeping the cold and the dark at bay. We are a nation of voyeurs--we like to watch (often from a safe distance) our idols, our heroes, and our messiahs live on the verge of an insanity and chaos that we ourselves are afraid to court.

This book argues that On the Road is a rhetorical document with persuasive significance in helping people to restructure their lives. The rhetorical significance of On the Road demands elaboration for what it can suggest about the future. Rhetoric, after all, is the study of potentialities, of changes, of futures. Kerouac's writing serves as a tool that empowers people to take control of their lives and to reject the dominant forces that constrain their thoughts and actions. Thus, the study of Kerouac is a study of rhetorical transformations.

In celebrating the margins of experience and the intensity of life, Kerouac helped develop the commitment and attitude of a larger American culture that was beginning to struggle with the tensions and contradictions of society. Through the aid of a focused narrative that graphically names and illustrates these tensions and contradictions, the reader of Kerouac's book becomes capable of responding to the larger, confusing culture in a strategic manner. Kerouac's rhetorical vision of an alternative social and cultural reality contributes to the identity of localized cultures within the United States.

Chapters 1 through 4 offer a rationale for this study, in which the relationships among Kerouac, rhetoric, and culture are highlighted. They provide biographical and historical context for readers unfamiliar with Kerouac, the "Beat Generation," or the cultural milieu of American society in the 1950s and 1960s.

-xi-

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The View from on the Road: The Rhetorical Vision of Jack Kerouac
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part One - Departures 1
  • 1 - Rhetorical Transformations 3
  • 2 - Kerouac in Context 15
  • 3 - Kerouac's Rhetorical Situation 27
  • 4 - Fantasy, Rhetorical Vision, and the Critical Act 43
  • Part Two - View from the Road 59
  • 5 - The Vision of Social Deviance 61
  • 6 - The Vision of Sexuality 74
  • 7 - Dean as Vision 82
  • 8 - Conclusion: Kerouac and Liminality 94
  • Notes 105
  • Bibliography 113
  • Index 125
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