Heresy and Authority in Medieval Europe: Documents in Translation

By Edward Peters | Go to book overview
He asked them of their faith, that they might set it forth. They answered that they would not say unless they were compelled.
He interrogated them concerning the baptism of children, and if they will be saved by baptism? They said, that they should say nothing; but would answer out of the Epistles and Gospels.
He questioned them as to the body and blood of Christ; where it was consecrated, or by whom, and who received it, and if it was more, or better consecrated by a good than by a bad person? They answered that those who received worthily were saved; and those who received unworthily, procured to themselves damnation; and they said that it was consecrated by every good man, whether an ecclesiastic or a layman; and they answered nothing else, because they would not be compelled to answer concerning their faith.
He asked them what they thought of matrimony; and if a man and a woman who were so joined together could be saved? They would not answer, except this only -- namely, that man and woman were united to avoid luxury and fornication, as St. Paul has said in his Epistle.
He asked them concerning repentance -- whether when it took place at the time of death it availed to salvation; or if soldiers who were mortally wounded could be saved if they repented at the point of death; or if every person ought to confess his sins to the priests and ministers of the Church or to any layman; or of whom it was that St. James spoke when he said, "Confess your sins one to another"? They said in reply, that it was sufficient for sick persons to confess to whomsoever they pleased; but of soldiers they would not speak, because St. James says nothing except of sick persons.

He asked also of them whether the contrition of the heart and the confession of the mouth alone were necessary to repentance? Or if it was necessary that after repentance they should make satisfaction by fastings, mortifications, and alms, bewailing their sins, if they had the means? They answered, and said that James had said only that they should confess and so be saved; and they did not wish to be better than the Apostle, and to add any thing of their own, as the bishops do.

They said also, many things without being asked. That it is altogether unlawful to swear any oath, as Jesus said in the gospel, and James in his epistle.

They said also, that Paul stated in his epistle what sort of persons were to be ordained in the Church as bishops and presbyters; and that if such persons were not ordained as St. Paul directed they were not

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Heresy and Authority in Medieval Europe: Documents in Translation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.