NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

difficulties and been so gravely weakened and isolated as now. The Indochinese peoples are fighting for a just cause; they have a correct line; they are animated by an unshakable determination; they have forged an indestructible solidarity; moreover, they possess greater strength and enjoy more vigorous sympathy and support than ever from the peoples of the world. The conference expresses its firm conviction that the three Indochinese peoples on the victorious advance will make full use of their position of having the initiative and being on the offensive, and persistently carry on and intensify the struggle in all fields, and will certainly win complete victory.


CHAPTER SIX
Help Support the Joint Declaration!*

The Command of the Cambodian National Liberation Army in the liberated area of Cambodia issued on May 3 a statement on the Summit Conference of the Indochinese Peoples, according to a report quoting the Information Bureau of the National United Front of Kampuchea. The statement reads in full:

In face of the betrayal by the Lon Nol-Sirik Matak clique and the danger of armed aggression by the U.S. imperialists against Cambodia's territory, the entire Khmer people have risen up at the same time to wage a courageous struggle against the acts of aggression of the U.S. imperialists and to overthrow the reactionary clique, their henchmen. It is in this high tide of struggle of the Khmer people that the Cambodian National Liberation Army came into being.

The Cambodian National Liberation Army comprises the sons of the patriotic Khmer people of all strata, victims of oppression and repression by the reactionary Lon Nol-Sirik Matak clique. Every cadre and fighter of the Cambodian National Liberation Army, nurturing profound hatred for the traitors and aggressors,

____________________
*
From Peking Review, No. 21, May 22, 1970.

-66-

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