NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

of the socialist countries. We believe that this aid is a historic obligation, because we consider that our struggle also constitutes a defense of the socialist countries. And we want to say particularly that the Soviet Union, first of all, and China, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and other socialist countries continue to aid us, which we consider very useful for the development of our armed struggle. We also want to lay special emphasis on the untiring efforts-- sacrifices that we deeply appreciate--that the people of Cuba--a small country without great resources, one that is struggling against the blockade by the U.S. and other imperialists--are making to give effective aid to our struggle. For us, this is a constant source of encouragement, and it also contributes to cementing more and more the solidarity between our Party and the Cuban Party, between our people and the Cuban people, a people that we consider African. And it is enough to see the historical, political, and blood ties that unite us to be able to say this. Therefore, we are very happy with the aid that the Cuban people give us, and we are sure that they will continue increasing their aid to our heroic national liberation struggle in spite of all difficulties.


CHAPTER TWO
Why UNITA?* Central Committee of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA)

UNITA wages an armed struggle as the main form of struggle; UNITA represents a new step in the struggle of Angola, because for the first time in the history of the struggle for liberation, a political party was born from inside action, instead of being an action initiated from the military camps based in neighboring countries. Consequently, UNITA has the support of the people inside the country. UNITA IS THE PEOPLE IN ARMS. The reasons of its being are, among others:

____________________
*
From Angola--Seventh Year, 1968.

-170-

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