NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

the future--and this is important--the next generation may take from imperialism the hope of winning over our people and enslaving them again. This is our fundamental perspective: to broaden the political struggle, elevate the consciousness, consolidate our unity, and extend the guerrilla war to our entire territory.

Revolution is the best school for the oppressed peoples, the best university of all times, the best instrument for destroying colonialism and serving the people. We want our people to really be the ones who govern their country in the future.


CHAPTER FIVE
The Liberation Struggle in the Islands of Comoro* Tawata Mapunda

The collapse of direct French colonialism in Africa has not yet reached its final stage. Under no circumstances could France claim to have returned all other people's lands plundered and grabbed during the "scramble for Africa" back in the nineteenth century.

At present the republic of France firmly clings to two African territories which she regards as integral parts of the republic. It is also a fallacy on the part of France to claim that the Somali strip of Djibouti and the islands of Comoro are the provinces of France. But the people living in these French colonies are not complacent with nor have they been reconciled to the idea that they are part and parcel of the French nation. They view things and their position from a different political spectrum altogether.

In the islands of Comoro, for example, the task of throwing off the chains of French colonialism and oppression has been taken over by the National Liberation Movement of Comoro--commonly known as MOLINACO. The liberation movement is based in Dar es Salaam where it maintains its provisional headquarters

____________________
*
Mimeographed document submitted to the Editors, Dar es Salaam, December 20, 1970.

-180-

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