NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

counterpart of these military-nationalist regimes. Notwithstanding his Party's commitment to national liberation, Allende's powers are narrowly constricted by the Constitution, the military, and by powerful opposition parties together representing a majority of the electorate.) Second, there are the survivors of the hard-line, militant Communist and Workers' Parties of the past, whose pro-Moscow orientation has yet to discourage them from opting for armed struggle as one of several roads to revolution, if not the only or fundamental one. Notable examples are the Guatemalan, Dominican, and Colombian Parties, and the Trotskyist Parties of Bolivia and Peru. Third, the Marxist-Leninist pro-Peking splinter parties are in principle committed to people's war in Peru and Bolivia, and in practice involved in a protracted armed struggle in Colombia. Fourth, inspired by Havana and the strategical concepts of Che and Debray there are, or were, guerrilla focos and self-styled Armies of National Liberation (ELN) operating in Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia, the Front of National Liberation (FLN) and Armed Forces of National Liberation (FALN) fighting in Venezuela, and Marighella's action group prior to its transformation into the National Liberation Action (ALN) in Brazil. And finally there is the composite or synthesis of these various movements representing a political line independent of either Moscow, Peking, or Havana, such as the Revolutionary Vanguard of Peru, the National Liberation Action in Brazil, the Argentine Revolutionary Armed Forces, and the Uruguayan Tupamaros.


CHAPTER ONE
General Declaration* First Conference of the Organization for Latin American Solidarity (OLAS)

This Conference, after a deep and exhaustive analysis of the conditions existing on the continent and after having ideologically

____________________
*
From Documents of OLAS, Havana, July-August, 1967.

-222-

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