NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

in other places new fronts should be set up. The direct struggle in each country, separated from its neighbor, would only be an enormous waste of effort involving a tremendous loss of time and manpower.

A country like Venezuela, for example, of such great significance to imperialism, runs the risk of massive destruction should it proceed alone on its own war of liberation. But if plans for joint struggle are made with Colombian, Peruvian, and other patriots, then imperialism can find itself in an awkward situation, inasmuch as it is unable to concentrate all of its forces against a single revolutionary front. At that moment, it will not be only the Venezuelans who will draw important benefits, but also the Peruvians, the Colombians, in short, the entire continental movement. Thus, before launching offensives prematurely, guided by optimistic appraisals, the FALN searches for a correct view of the situation in order to establish a better understanding with the Venezuelan peasantry and the proletariat through persistent work--hard and not very visible from far away--at the same time that it synchronizes its actions with other continental movements. This tactic should not be assessed in the wrong manner. We are trying to apply what we have learned from the changes that have taken place, in view of the new conditions confronting us since the Cuban Revolution. Whatever happens in the near future will put to the test the effectiveness of this tactic.


CHAPTER FOUR
Interview with Comandante Moises Moleiro* Secretary-General of the Venezuelan Movement of the Revolutionary Left (MIR)

What prospects does an armed conflict hold?

The prospects of armed conflict in Venezuela, as in almost all Latin American countries, are of a long-range victory which will

____________________
*
Interview, April, 1968. From Esquina, Bogotá, December, 1968. Translated by Sara Clemente and Donald C. Hodges.

-238-

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