NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

Meanwhile, it is also true that there is a reactionary conspiracy and that reactionary circles in Brazil defend and pray for this conspiracy. We are confident, however, that Allende will become President. In this, he will have the massive support of the people of Chile, who will be able to repel any attack similar to the one carried out in Santo Domingo. If anything like that should happen, Washington will see an anti-U.S. revolutionary war break out throughout the entire continent.

Such an act would set off a conflagration that would utterly engulf the "international gendarme," dealing it a defeat as serious as the one it is being dealt in Vietnam.


CHAPTER ELEVEN
Interview with a Leader of Uruguay's National Liberation Movement (TUPAMAROS)*

What is the immediate program of the MLN?

During this period our program consists of six points. The first one is the release of all imprisoned comrades. The second point calls for the unfreezing of wages. Next comes the lifting of all governmental interventions in the state's industrial and trade agencies and particularly in education, the lifting of the state of emergency measures and all laws applied in this connection, and the reinstatement of all workers who have lost their jobs.

Defending this program, we Tupamaros call on the people to fight the order of the dictatorship and claim the right of all to a homeland--this homeland of ours, which is now a homeland for the few but is denied to the many.

Aside from the political significance often implicit in some of the Tupamaros' actions, have the Tupamaros set themselves the specific task of carrying out work of political clarification, of spreading ideas and their line among the people of Uruguay?

We believe that we have already won the support of the mass of

____________________
1
From Granma, Havana, October 13, 1970.

-282-

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