NLF; National Liberation Fronts: 1960/1970

By Robert Shanab Elias Abu; Donald C. Hodges | Go to book overview

Those who denounce the "terrorists" are playing the game of the repression, as René Levesque (perhaps unconsciously) gives his support to colonialism and imperialism when he denounces the demonstrations organized by the LIS.

There is so much to denounce in the system, so much to challenge, so much to destroy, without wasting one's energies on making the FLQ the scapegoat for everybody. We must not forget that it is all the revolutionaries of Quebec who, by their action and their determination, created the FLQ.

The FLQ will last as long as there are revolutionaries in Quebec determined to win.


CHAPTER TWO
Interview with Juan Mari Bras* Leader of the Puerto Rican Pro-Independence Movement (MPI)

What is the state of the Left in Puerto Rico?

The Left in Puerto Rico is often confused with the independence movement. Of course the latter is stronger in quantitative terms; there are conservatives and liberals who are independistas. However, the main force of the independence movement is now organized by Left-wing organizations, with a program for national liberation, a Marxist method of analysis, and socialist objectives. The Movimiento Pro-Independencia (MPI), which includes the immense majority of the organized Left, is the broadest and at the same time the most radical of the two main independence movements. The other is the Partido Independista de Puerto Rico (PIP). The PIP--which a few years back was a liberal patriotic organization--is becoming a socialist force. It is not a Marxist organization, since it contains certain ideological confusions. In defining socialism, they cite St. Luke and St. Matthew as well as Marx. Nevertheless, there has been a qualitative development in the corn-

____________________
*
Interview by Peter Roman, Guardian, November 14 and 21, 1970.

-329-

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