Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, 1945-1957

By Elena Zubkova; Hugh Ragsdale | Go to book overview

Chapter 14
The Evolution of Public Opinion: "Whose Fault Is It?"

Political intimidation in a highly charged atmosphere always has a psychological limit. "A society seized by panic," according to L.N. Voitolovskii, "loses its sensitivity to the discord of public life [as the Stalin regime intended it to do--E.Z.], while the society itself begins to generate oppressive and alarming emotions that lead to a numbing feebleness, apathy, and defeatism." 1 This kind of outcome was directly contrary to the principles of a functioning socialist society, which depended on the support of a highly developed public discourse. If this society required an organic mechanism of terror to safeguard its security, then it needed other instruments to stimulate its cultural and economic life. The terror diverted people's attention from the real reasons for their misfortune, sending them on a false search for enemies. This search, however, only led from negative results to endless pretexts and excuses for them, while what was needed was a policy to engender positive, forward-looking, and inspiring attitudes that would elicit support for the government. The crucial feature of such policies is that their results are not calculated exclusively by material output but by the popularity of the government legislating them. Such policies, whatever their particular content, are always essentially populist.

Lowering prices naturally comes at the head of the list of populist policies. Therefore Stalin in 1947 did precisely that, a politically unimpeachable success. From 1947 through 1954, retail prices were reduced seven times. This tactic brought enormous strategic gain. The advocates of the regime invariably argued on such occasions that it

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, 1945-1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.