Chapter III
Skepticism and Orthodoxy

From Franklin's account in his autobiography, it is clear that his introduction to sophisticated, skeptical writing came unabetted by his father, though one suspects Josiah Franklin was too wise, as Benjamin grew older, to try to censor his reading. The shift from parental to self-direction in learning, at any rate, came decisively at age twelve in 1718, when Benjamin was apprenticed to his brother James, in his second year as a Boston printer. In the printing shop, as Benjamin recalled later, "I had Access to better Books. . . . Often I sat up in my Room reading the greatest Part of the Night." Franklin reveled in his wonderful new world of words, soon began imitating the poets he read, and undertook to dispute with other youths the new doctrines he encountered. The most important book he discovered was "an odd Volume of the Spectator": he "bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it." How Franklin tried to imitate its style by writing on the same subjects as The Spectator, comparing his efforts with the original, and then correcting by searching for better words or more concise sentences, is a well-known story. In this way he developed the clear, sharp expression which still makes him one of the most widely admired writers in English. Later he often remarked on the advantages acquired in business

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Benjamin Franklin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The GREAT AMERICAN THINKERS Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology xi
  • Chapter I- Boyhood Training 1
  • Chapter II- Early Readinq 9
  • Chapter III- Skepticism and Orthodoxy 32
  • Chapter IV- Business, Personal, and Civic Virtue 55
  • Chapter V- Science 78
  • Chapter VI- Politics 88
  • Chapter VII- Vision of Empire- From Loyalty to Revolution 111
  • Chapter VIII- The Art of Congeniality 135
  • Chapter IX- International Relations 149
  • Chapter X- Religion 163
  • Chapter XI- The Public Philosophy of a Saqe 185
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.