European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History

By Karen Offen | Go to book overview

5
Birthing the "Woman Question," 1848-1870

The crust of patriarchal political order rocked and trembled in 1848, the so-called springtime of the peoples. Beginning with the ouster of Louis-Philippe in Paris, protests and disturbances erupted in Berlin, Vienna, and Frankfurt, in Mainz, Meissen, Milan, Modena, Barcelona, Cologne, Prague, Venice, and Stockholm. The once redoutable chancellor of Austria, Prince Metternich, fled Vienna for exile, and the once fearsome European system of control on freedom of speech, the press, and association evaporated--though only temporarily. "Democracy" was on the march--but would it include women?

In some of these cities, feminist activity poured forth through the fissures opened by men's claims for representative government, for freedom of the press and association. Once again claiming their share of liberty, women founded newspapers and formed their own associations to demand rights and acknowledge their duties as integral members of "the people." Some demanded the right to vote on laws, freedom in marriage, including the right to divorce, and they called for educational and economic solutions to combat women's growing poverty. Others fought alongside men on the revolutionary barricades; a few even adopted male costume in order to fight against the established order. In Paris, a group of women who baptized themselves "the Vesuviennes," after the famous volcano in southern Italy, organized to parade through the streets in revolutionary bloomer costumes and tricolor sashes, whetting enthusiasm for the new order. Their "political constitution" called for men to share the housework, and demanded civil divorce. 1 They clearly believed, with the Saxon activists Robert Blum and Louise Otto, that "women's participation in the state is not just a right but a duty." 2

The feminist honor roll for the 1848 revolutions grows ever longer. In the German-speaking world, the names of Louise Otto in Saxony, Matilda Franziska Anneke in Cologne, Kathinka Zitz-Halein in Mainz, and Karoline Perin in Vienna have joined the list of known activists in

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Feminisms, 1700-1950: A Political History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 554

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.