Aruba Past and Present: From the Time of the Indians until Today

By Johan Hartog; J. A. Verleun | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
ARUBA NOW

About ten years have passed since the manuscript of this history of Aruba was closed. That was when, on the Island Regulation taking effect in 1951, our island became independent. It is with pleasure that we now comply with the publisher's request to complete this second--in other respects unaltered edition--by giving a survey of the last few years. In writing this addition it cannot be our purpose to give a chronological report, for which we refer the reader to the papers. An impression is all that can be given within the compass of this postscript.

The new island administration, the Council, had only held the reins for a few weeks, when a serious labour conflict arose on Aruba. On 9th August 1951 an outlaw strike broke out at Lago Oil & Transport Company. In the course of a few days it assumed impressive proportions-- about 3,500 people took part in it--and necessitated drastic measures both on the part of the Insular Government and on that of the Federal Government. On Sunday August 12th the Council had an emergency meeting. Matters even came to such a pass that units of the Royal Dutch Marines had to become active against rioting groups, which, as it turned out, were mainly composed of imported hands. Certain wage demands formed the incitement to this strike.

After some days the parties reached an agreement, but the events of August 1951 caused the right to strike to be restricted. In 1952 the 1946 Federal Ordinance Concerning Labour Disputes and the Penal Code were modified accordingly.

In 1950 relations between management and labourers at Lago had been canalized by an agreement to be renewed every year between the management and the Lago Employee Council. In 1955 800 members of the Petroleum Workers' Federation of Aruba demanded a referendum as to the desirability of dissolving this Employee Council. This referendum was actually taken on 24-26 August 1955. Its results were in favour of a continuance of the Council, which accordingly remained the labourers' representative body.

At the request of the Petroleum Workers' Federation of Aruba another referendum about the same question was held in May 1957 again showing a preference for the continuation of the Employee Council. In November 1959 the Federation attempted to achieve their aims by means of a strike which resulted in failure through the tepid enthusiasm of the workers.

-428-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aruba Past and Present: From the Time of the Indians until Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.