Intergroup Relations

By Walter G. Stephan; Cookie White Stephan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
5 Intercultural Relations

CHAPTER OULTINE
Culture Intercultural Communication
Cultural Differences Training
Parallel Processes in Intergroup Types of Training
and Intercultural Relations Culture-General Versus
Stereotyping Culture-Specific Training
Attributional Biases Training in Similarities Versus
Ethnocentrism Training in Differences
Intergroup Anxiety Lessons for Intergroup
Culture Shock Interaction
Summary

In England, Americans are often perceived as being loud and insincere. In the United States, Americans often find the British to be passive and cold. Americans characterize themselves as being outgoing and friendly, while the British characterize themselves as being reserved and polite.

Islamic nations believe that segregating the sexes protects women and honors the special roles they perceive that women play in life. Many individuals from non-Islamic nations believe that women under Islam are powerless and devalued.

European tourists to Japan, experiencing the pushing and shoving that can accompany boarding public transportation, sometimes complain that the Japanese are rude. The Japanese, however, feel they uphold basic principles of respect and honor for others much more than Europeans.

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intergroup Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter - 1 Stereotypes 1
  • Summary 30
  • Chapter - 2 Theories of Prejudice 33
  • Chapter - 3 The Contact Hypothesis in Intergroup Relations 61
  • Summary 86
  • Chapter - 4 Social Identity, Self-Categorization, and Intergroup Attitudes 89
  • Summary 111
  • Chapter - 5 Intercultural Relations 115
  • Summary 138
  • Chapter - 6 Intergroup Conflict and Its Resolution 141
  • Summary 169
  • References 173
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.