CHAPTER II
TOLSTOY'S READINGS ON CHINA

IN HIS Tolstoi und der Orient, pp. 258-263, Biryukov lists 54 books, pamphlets and periodicals, relative to various oriental civilizations, religions and philosophies, which he says existed in Tolstoy's library at Yasnaya Polyana. Thirteen of them are important for our purpose because they relate directly to China. These can be more than doubled, however, by examination of other sources, particularly Tolstoy's diaries and correspondence, in which numerous additional publications on China are mentioned as having reached Tolstoy in the form of loans, gifts or purchases. The result is a total of 32 publications on China (some mere pamphlets, others works in as many as three volumes) which can be stated with assurance to have passed through Tolstoy's hands at one time or another. There are, in addition, seven "uncertain items," here so designated either because they cannot be precisely identified, or because, though referred to in correspondence between Tolstoy and others, it is not definitely ascertainable whether they actually reached him or not.

In Appendix B of the present book will be found a detailed list of all these works, arranged, when the data permit, according to the years in which they first reached Tolstoy's attention, or, when this is impossible, according to their dates of original publication. They are grouped under the following categories: I. General and Miscellaneous (nos. 1-10); II. Confucianism (nos. 11-18); III. Taoism (nos. 19-28); IV. Buddhism (nos. 29-32); V. Uncertain Items (nos. 33-39).

-11-

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Tolstoy and China - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The History of Ideas Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I- China, the West, and Tolstoy 3
  • Chapter II- Tolstoy''s Readings on China 11
  • Chapter III- Tolstoy''s Writings and Publications on China 30
  • Chapter IV- Tolstoy''s Contacts with Chinese 47
  • Chapter V- The Meaning of China to Tolstoy 59
  • Chapter VI- The Question of Chinese Influence 75
  • Appendix A 91
  • Appendix B- List of Works on China Read by Tolstoy 95
  • Bibliography 103
  • Index 107
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